• Chan Gin Kai

Jesus Has All The Answers

Chan Gin Kai



Luke 20:20-26


Keeping a close watch on him, they sent spies, who pretended to be sincere. They hoped to catch Jesus in something he said, so that they might hand him over to the power and authority of the governor. So the spies questioned him: “Teacher, we know that you speak and teach what is right, and that you do not show partiality but teach the way of God in accordance with the truth. Is it right for us to pay taxes to Caesar or not?” (Luke 20:20-22)


I enjoyed it in the school debates they used to broadcast on TV decades ago, and especially in the legal dramas that I still love watching... the clever traps, the witty comebacks, and the killer punchlines. I marvel at how quickly and intelligently the protagonists and antagonists strategise their verbal battles, by how facts can be twisted, and liars can be out-maneuvered.


If I had been there, watching all that happened in Luke 20 between the chief priests, the teachers of the law, the elders, the spies they planted, the Sadducees, and Jesus, I would have thoroughly enjoyed it. The various groups of religious leaders attempted to trap Jesus, but all of them failed miserably.


Earlier, some had tried to tried to ensnare Jesus by asking who gave him the authority to preach, but he cleverly sidestepped them (Luke 20:1-8).


This time, they planted spies “who pretended to be sincere”. They even praised him, thinking that flattery would imbue him with pride and make him lower his defences. But Jesus couldn’t be deceived, and he outwitted them again.


He saw through their duplicity and said to them, “Show me a denarius. Whose image and inscription are on it?”

“Caesar’s,” they replied.

He said to them, “Then give back to Caesar what is Caesar’s, and to God what is God’s.”

They were unable to trap him in what he had said there in public. And astonished by his answer, they became silent.

(Luke 20:23-26)


Another group tried again later, asking a controversial issue that the Sadducees and Pharisees had debated for ages, but Jesus intelligently and easily put that question to rest too. The enemies were throughly defeated “and no one dared to ask him any more questions” (Luke 20:27-40).

Jesus saw all of their traps, cleverly evaded them, turned the situation around to challenge their hypocrisy, and at the same time provided a learning point for the crowd. I would have cheered the loudest for Jesus if I was there; he had all the answers!!


And he still does.


Yes, Jesus has the riposte if we choose to oppose him like the religious leaders did. He has the solutions to every deceit that Satan seduces us with. And most importantly, he has the remedy to bring us back to the arms of God.


Jesus addressed huge crowds, but he also paid attention to the individuals too. Our questions matter to him.


No doubt is too big, and no query is too small to trouble Jesus with. He has the solutions to all of our questions, doubts and pains. But do we ask him?

Jesus does not only reply in words, he responds in deeds too. He listens to our prayers and answers them.


Are we troubled by politics at work or burdened by the worries of life? Are we saddened by the loss of someone close? Are we hurt by malicious words or careless deeds? Do we feel trapped by sin despite efforts to change? Do we feel unloved or alone? Bring them to Jesus; pray to God. Your feelings matter to God, and He has the answers.


Cast all your anxiety on Him because He cares for you. (1 Peter 5:7)


He can lift the burden of worries from our weary shoulders. He can break the chains of sin that enslave us. He can fill the emptiness in our souls, and heal our broken hearts. He can refresh us with peace, and fill us with an indescribable lightness that permeates every cell of our bodies. Jesus is able, and he is willing, because he cares for us.


Jesus had all the answers. He still does.



Chan Gin Kai

Gin Kai is a film producer who believes in the power of media to inspire positive changes. He has spearheaded disaster relief and capacity building projects in impoverished communities across Asia. He serves actively in the Central Christian Church and describes himself as “just a sinner who wants to get right with God”.